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Goals?

Goals?

From:
Ron DuPlain
Date:
2010-02-10 @ 19:15
Question 1: What is our goal with cville@librelist.com (and it's members)?

Question 2: Do we have any goals with cville@librelist.com?

Regarding #2, it's cool if we don't, but I think that we do.  As far
as I know, there are 3 of us on this list, and the 3 of us think (as
of the last PyCHO meetup) that there is an opportunity for more hack
nights in Charlottesville.  We have plenty of tech social
opportunities (a good example being First Wednesday).  We have an
active university (which has what I would call a modern tech).  We
have an annual bar camp (beCamp, which is awesome btw).  We have
groups to discuss tech for business or tech in general (a good example
being Neon Guild).  We have several language developer groups.  We
have a co-working space.  We even have a potential hackerspace in the
works (http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Cville_hSpace).

We started cville@librelist.com to have a mailing list with an
emphasis on local dialog and open source and open platforms.

... starting with 3 of us who know each other well and share this idea
of open hacking.

Question 3: Do we need to take it further?

I think so.  It would be nice to hack together.

Question 4: How do we take it further?

I really don't know.  "it" needs some definition, and perhaps some identity.

Zed Shaw (guy and tech behind librelist) experimented with this idea
of the Freehacker's Union.  He claims it failed.
http://zedshaw.com/blog/2009-03-16.html

I think there's something there, and I think Zed's discussion -- which
is a bit abrasive, but you gotta love his openness -- is articulating
something we're after: hack for the sake of the hack, and for God's
sake, keep it open.

Have any thoughts, or do I think way too much about this?

Ron


PS - Quote from Zed's reflection on how he'd approach the Freehacker's
Union differently:

"First, I’d make it less fight club style, way more open, and with a
lot less rules. I guess it’s from my days playing D&D where I come up
with these bizarre ass rules for social events.

Second, I wouldn’t make it anti-something, but pro-something. Defining
the group in terms of anti-business meant that when business went
south there wasn’t anything to be against. Being pro-hacking is the
way to go.

Third, I’d pick one particular niche art and one particular niche
technology and start with that. Like right now I’d love to do a group
of geeks making music tech.

Fourth, I’d remove the focus on performance and public speaking.
Frankly, most geeks just aren’t into that.

Finally, I think I would need to devote my spare time to the group and
not spread myself so thin. It’s not possible to work, go to school,
write a book, and run a group like FU. To keep up the momentum you
have to get involved, run meetings, and notify people of them in
advance."

Re: Goals?

From:
Ron DuPlain
Date:
2010-02-13 @ 07:40
I had a lively conversation with Kai tonight around these questions.
Here's what we concluded:

Question 1: What is our goal with cville@librelist.com (and it's members)?

Have hack nights.  Often.  Hack on open {source,platforms} in
computing and electronics.

Often = ideally once a week or more.  Think: "I'll be at X on Monday
evening.  I'll be thinking about technologies Y and Z, but I'm open to
working on anything.  Anyone want to meet up?"  Not formal, but can be
if that's what people want.  Keep the hack going.


Question 2: Do we have any goals with cville@librelist.com?

We primarily want an accessible local community of independent
software developers who hack for the sake of hacking.  I don't know of
any group in town which offers just that, and any group out there like
this isn't local.  Local is key.  Hacking is the primary concern.

No fancy medium.  In my experience hackers need 3 things to connect:

   1. a mailing list (you're looking at it)

   2. an IRC channel (let's go to #cville on freenode?)

   3. a web presence with little more than logs/archives for #1 and #2
and a page to find all of the above

We don't need #3 until #1 and #2 are in steady state.


Question 3: Do we need to take it further?

"Need?"  We certainly want to work on open collaborative projects, so
let's get more people involved.

A point of motivation: the conversation we had this week on revision
control migration had incredibly high signal-to-noise ratio, and I
learned a lot in 4 highly concise messages.  I wouldn't be able to
have that effective of a conversation elsewhere...


Question 4: How do we take it further?

We open up the conversation to new people, one at a time.  We start
with people who have a lot of enthusiasm for learning new open
{source,platforms} in computing/electronics, and preferably (at first)
have been acting on that enthusiasm for some years.  We want to get a
core of people who can identify with Q&A-1,2,3 above, and who can set
the stage for etiquette and scope.  It's easiest if this core has a
history of interaction and trust.

We suspect the group will tip with membership as low as single digits
and no higher than fifteen members.

Leadership is decentralized.  We don't want formal membership (and
that means no dues), and we like the fact that you can't (I think) see
who's subscribed to the mailing list on librelist.com.  We don't want
sponsorship, unless it provides some facility necessary to Q&A-1,2,3
above.  In my opinion, any sponsorship should be transparent and
minimal.  The only thing to promote is hacking.

Tell a local hacking friend,

Ron


PS - hacking, not cracking

PPS - That's a lot of text for elaborating on original seed "Let's
have more hack nights," but we're finding this is harder to articulate
than it first seems, particularly when scaling it out to people we
haven't met yet.


On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 2:15 PM, Ron DuPlain <ron.duplain@gmail.com> wrote:
> Question 1: What is our goal with cville@librelist.com (and it's members)?
>
> Question 2: Do we have any goals with cville@librelist.com?
>
> Regarding #2, it's cool if we don't, but I think that we do.  As far
> as I know, there are 3 of us on this list, and the 3 of us think (as
> of the last PyCHO meetup) that there is an opportunity for more hack
> nights in Charlottesville.  We have plenty of tech social
> opportunities (a good example being First Wednesday).  We have an
> active university (which has what I would call a modern tech).  We
> have an annual bar camp (beCamp, which is awesome btw).  We have
> groups to discuss tech for business or tech in general (a good example
> being Neon Guild).  We have several language developer groups.  We
> have a co-working space.  We even have a potential hackerspace in the
> works (http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Cville_hSpace).
>
> We started cville@librelist.com to have a mailing list with an
> emphasis on local dialog and open source and open platforms.
>
> ... starting with 3 of us who know each other well and share this idea
> of open hacking.
>
> Question 3: Do we need to take it further?
>
> I think so.  It would be nice to hack together.
>
> Question 4: How do we take it further?
>
> I really don't know.  "it" needs some definition, and perhaps some identity.
>
> Zed Shaw (guy and tech behind librelist) experimented with this idea
> of the Freehacker's Union.  He claims it failed.
> http://zedshaw.com/blog/2009-03-16.html
>
> I think there's something there, and I think Zed's discussion -- which
> is a bit abrasive, but you gotta love his openness -- is articulating
> something we're after: hack for the sake of the hack, and for God's
> sake, keep it open.
>
> Have any thoughts, or do I think way too much about this?
>
> Ron
>
>
> PS - Quote from Zed's reflection on how he'd approach the Freehacker's
> Union differently:
>
> "First, I’d make it less fight club style, way more open, and with a
> lot less rules. I guess it’s from my days playing D&D where I come up
> with these bizarre ass rules for social events.
>
> Second, I wouldn’t make it anti-something, but pro-something. Defining
> the group in terms of anti-business meant that when business went
> south there wasn’t anything to be against. Being pro-hacking is the
> way to go.
>
> Third, I’d pick one particular niche art and one particular niche
> technology and start with that. Like right now I’d love to do a group
> of geeks making music tech.
>
> Fourth, I’d remove the focus on performance and public speaking.
> Frankly, most geeks just aren’t into that.
>
> Finally, I think I would need to devote my spare time to the group and
> not spread myself so thin. It’s not possible to work, go to school,
> write a book, and run a group like FU. To keep up the momentum you
> have to get involved, run meetings, and notify people of them in
> advance."
>